Tuesday, October 5, 2010

Rabbits Dance Farm

I have a habit of compulsively seeking out garden information now. And somehow, this impromptu research is starting to fill my head with useful information. The extent of my garden geekery was made clear this evening at Garden Club, when a farmer gave a presentation on growing garlic, and I already knew most of what she had to say. I felt bad at one point for contradicting her when she suggested growing garlic from bulbs purchased at the grocery store, since I have read that chemicals are sometimes used to inhibit sprouting, but hopefully this led to more people buying her garlic at the end of the presentation. I brought a pound home myself, by way of apology, and because I want to support my local farmers, and because at the rate we are eating up last year's garlic crop, we need a refill to plant with.

The farmer is Kristin of Rabbits Dance Farm, and, alas, she is giving up on farming! She ever-so-nobly ran a CSA for a few years, and even trained some farmers-to-be, but ultimately decided that teaching yoga and running a veggie garden consulting service was where her heart lies. And, as she put it, farming is ten times harder and earns ten times less than just about any other job. I shake my fist in frustration for small farmers everywhere, and wish her the best in her new business endeavors.

I seem to be all out of photos again. Time to take more!

4 comments:

gardenwalkgardentalk.com said...

Enjoyed your story on garlic growing. I too feel sorry for the small farmers. I try to support them when I can. I saw one of my favorites go out of business last year. That is hard after generations ran the farm for so long.

Autumn Belle said...

I would like to invite you to "Gardening A Game!". Please visit my link here:
http://www.mynicegarden.com/2010/10/gardening-game.html

I'd like to know more about you, my dear ;-)

Karen said...

I grew up on a small farm and can tell you, yes, you're right, farming is very difficult and pays much, much less than anything else a person can do. Unfortunately there's very little respect for farmers, too. We're often viewed as imbeciles.
Thank you for doing your best to support your local farmers, I'm sure they appreciate it--no other profession works so hard at all hours of the day and night in all sorts of weather and in all types of conditions for dirt-cheap prices. And no tips, either.

This farmer's daughter appreciated your post! :)

Maureen said...

Thanks for the reminder - I need to get some garlic! I'll check out her link.

I take off my hat to all farmers - they sure don't have an easy way of life.